Supporting Yourself Nutritionally with DoTERRA – Step One – Lifelong Vitality Pack

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These supplements are key to my survival.
People talk about supplements all of the time, but there is a major difference between brands. You can choose to believe me or you can believe science, or you can listen to both and make your own decisions from there.

I started taking this combination of supplements after my first go around with cancer. I was depleted, foggy, toxic, had no energy, and wasn’t sleeping well. I would not be able to fall asleep until after 3am and no matter how much I slept, never felt rested. I could barely get out of bed or off of the couch, let alone feel motivated to do anything productive.

I started on these supplements as the skeptic I am and every day felt the same as I had before. I’d tell myself they weren’t working, because, you know, we all want a magic pill that works immediately.

After 3+ weeks, I woke up one day and did my usual move to the sofa to watch Netflix. I realized I wanted to get up. I wanted to go outside. I did go outside and I sat on the deck listening to the world around me. It was a small shift, but it was wonderful. The next day, I felt the same. After a few more days I decided I wanted to make something. I started painting on a few things I had laying around.

This pattern continued until I reached the level of wanting to create and interact with the world more. I began to realize I was thinking more clearly. I wanted to eat more food. I was beginning to feel tired around midnight and sleeping deeper. My body aches were lessening. My feelings of depression lessened. Basically, I was given my life back.

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At my oncologists office, or when I spoke with others who had experience with cancer treatment, they couldn’t believe how good I looked and how quickly I was moving on to new things. I kept hearing it takes a year to detox after chemotherapy, yet I was thriving after a few months. The only thing I did was to add these supplements and a few other essential oils to my daily routine.

I can tell people how my life has changed and they can choose whether or not to believe me. If you know me, you know I am not someone who tries to convince people to buy things unless I’ve been convinced. If you don’t know me, I will tell you I am a diabetic who has survived both a major head on collision, and chemotherapy. I’m not some super healthy human specimen, who defied the odds. I am someone who was desperate to feel better and found something that works. It isn’t one magic pill. It’s a whole food, sustainably sourced, bioavailable, nutritionally balanced set of supplements that feed your body what it needs to function at optimal levels.

Now, if I run out and stop taking them for more than 3 days, I feel the difference. I don’t sleep as well and my aches and pains come back. As soon as I start them again, I get back on track. I am not taking ibuprofen like I was (3 times per day) for the residual issues from my car accident. I also took these my second time through chemotherapy, and am convinced they kept me nutritionally balanced when I often didn’t want to eat more than a protein shake. The systems of the body are supported and nutritional needs are met, even when you can’t take the time to eat well. These supplements make up for the lack of nutrients in the average diet, as well as what we are lacking in the soil we grow food in today. I don’t know anyone who can’t benefit from taking them.

If you want to feel better, support your body and brain health to the best of your ability, and are sick of over the counter medications that are bad for you and don’t fix anything, try these supplements. Invest in living the best life you can by loving your body enough to try these for 60 days. Two months is when your body is said to be using the supplements at their optimal level. Aren’t you worth that?

Please ask me if you have questions. I’m so glad the science is coming out about how great this product is, and proving the results I achieved are consistent.

Find the most recent study results here.

You can purchase them here.

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Where the Heck Have I Been?

I’m sitting in the chemo room at my oncology office. I’ve been thinking a lot lately about how I haven’t shared what’s happened with my last go around with cancer. I simply went quiet here. I have a private Facebook page for my friends and a public page under Fear is a 4-Letter Word, but I’ve neglected everything but my personal page for too long. It’s time to get back to writing and sharing with the world.

So, what happened to me? Well, I will try to summarize it for you. I completed full chemotherapy in June and waited for my doctor to order a PET scan to see what was going on in my body. We knew back in January/February that things looked grim. I was told to hope for a miracle.

It was the kind of news that is depressing, paralyzingly, horrifying, life-altering, and makes you want to scream and cry. Check to all of that. There’s much more attached to that news and how it affected my life, but I’ll write more about that later.

For now, let’s focus on that PET scan. I was expecting news that we had knocked back the cancer, but that it was still present. My wife did too. I’m not even sure what my doctor expected the results to be.

He called me on July 4th, while I was at a friend’s house. When I saw the name of the oncology office pop up on the screen, I thought it was just a reminder call about an appointment, so I didn’t answer. He left a voicemail asking me to return his call, that he had news for me. I was in the car on my way to see my wife when I listened to the voicemail. I started crying. I knew he wouldn’t call to give me bad news on a holiday. We were on speaker phone with him when he gave us the news, “You have no active cancer in your body”. We cried more and celebrated.

I have stayed on one chemo drug since June, as a preventative. Every three weeks my blood and urine are checked and I am given an IV with 30 minutes of the drug. My hair has grown back, although I’m now more comfortable with a shaved head. I don’t have nausea anymore, but I do have headaches. It’s tolerable and I’ve learned to manage/live with it.

I have returned to a somewhat normal life, although I have less energy and other physical issues that are taking a while to improve, mostly due to muscle weakness from so much inactivity. I have good and bad days. I was suffering from serious memory issues, but I’m regaining more ability in that department now. I am fortunate and am able to work around the remaining issues I have.

All of this has allowed me to focus on what I want to achieve with my life, and to lay the foundation for those things. I know what statistics show, but we achieved the miracle my doctor told me to hope for. I will not give up my life to worrying about this disease. If I expect it to return, what kind of life is that? I am staying positive and maintaining my natural health plan (more about that soon).

I am a survivor and am here to share my story and my journey. I have another chance and I’m going to use it.

❤️Love & Gratitude❤️ Kelly

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THIS IS WHAT IT FEELS LIKE TO GET A CLEAR SCAN.

Back in the Saddle Again

Today, I find myself writing this, after yet another whirlwind of appointments, upsets, and harsh realities. My cancer has spread. There’s no easy way to say that, so let’s just get to the point. It’s in the lymph nodes in my lungs and between my lungs. I’ve had a ct scan, a pet scan, a lung biopsy, and one MRI. We are doing MRIs of my lower lumbar and hip areas to determine if the original pain that is located in my SI/hip area is also cancerous. There are enlarged lymph nodes, but we don’t know if the bone is affected. No one wants to hear this news, certainly not someone who has already been through treatment and thought it was behind her.

We are wasting no time. On Monday I will get my port and on Thursday I will start chemo again. My oncologist has made it clear that this is serious. My wife and I sat across from him, hoping to hear better news, trying not to cry when it turned out to be worse. He went over everything and a game plan. Upon leaving the room, it was hard to see the staff looking back at me with what I call “cancer face”. It’s that sad face, where people can barely make eye contact, and feel sorry for you. I’ve experienced it before and will experience it again. It just happens, especially when people don’t know what to say.

We received our information for all of the upcoming appointments, walked out to the car, and then proceeded to sit there, crying and hugging each other. We certainly knew it was a possibility that it would come back. We knew it was aggressive and in my bloodstream and could resettle somewhere else. You know the facts, but you feel so good after finishing treatment that you move forward with your life and put it behind you. None of the typical symptoms occurred that would signal something is wrong. I had my checkups, and then something happened that made no sense until it lead to this new cancer diagnosis – pain in the SI/hip area. The pain has been going on for over 6 months now and I attributed it to a car accident I was involved in. I couldn’t understand why it wasn’t getting better. The pain happens when I lay down and I have discomfort in the same area and down the left leg the rest of the time. Advil has made it livable, although sleeping has been rough for months now. It’s easy to mistake that for an injury from a car accident.

I’m sharing this because I want people to practice self-care. I want them to be aware of what’s going on with their bodies. Something you keep excusing as nothing, could be something. Now, I don’t want to encourage people to think every pain is cancer. If you have symptoms that are persistent, especially if it gets worse, you should insist on being checked out. I had a chance to have an MRI 6 months ago, but I had to pay upfront for it. I couldn’t do it. If I’d had one then, I would have known what was going on and gotten a 6 month jump on treatment. Hindsight is 20/20, but it does no good to think that way. “If only I hadn’t eaten sugar”, “If only if I’d changed my diet sooner”, “If only I’d said something sooner” – none of this kind of thinking will heal you. It’s self-destructive and I’m putting it behind me.

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Feeling reflective

Now is the time for throwing everything at this. I’m at a crossroad and have to decide if I want to do everything I can to stick around, or if I want to half-ass it and hope for the best. If you’ve followed my journey thus far, I’m pretty sure you know what I’ve decided to do. I am starting back with chemo. I tolerated it well last time and the hope is that it will knock the cancer cells back. We now know it didn’t kill them off entirely last time, so I’m also starting the keto diet now. It’s a big switch from being a vegetarian, but the research I’ve done says it is the way to go. A side benefit of that is that it will knock down my blood sugar, which is awesome for any diabetic. I will be starting back with acupuncture, hypnosis, reiki, and massage. I am already using a combination of essential oils and supplements that will support my body, much like last time, except I’m increasing quantities. I’m going to be using hash oil and edibles to help with my appetite. So many things. It seems overwhelming at times, but trying everything together will leave me with no regrets.

At this point, I am only thinking of knocking this back and staying around. I am thinking about my nieces and nephew and my desire to watch them become fully functioning adults. I am thinking about the good things to come and my desire to be a apart of it. I am thinking about the plans I have with my wife and what I want to create through our artist’s studio and doTERRA business. I am thinking about the plans I have with my friends and wanting to establish our shared dream, Green Mountain Collective. At the end of the day, this project is my legacy. It encompasses my dreams and ideals and also benefits good people and our local community. I am thinking about what I have left to see, build, and experience, and the moments that take my breath away and make me appreciate being alive. I’m ready to keep fighting and you’re welcome to join me on this new, yet familiar journey.